District employees being trained on protocol to stop massive bleeds

District employees being trained on protocol to stop

By Eric Becker

CARLINVILLE (April 5, 2018) – Carlinville school district employees are beginning to be trained on what to do if confronted with someone in real dire of emergency aid.

Several transportation and cafeteria workers within the district Wednesday took part in a seminar called Stop the Bleed, sponsored free of charged by the HSHS St. John’s Regional Trauma Center in Springfield.

The event took place at Carlinville Area Hospital and was a two-hour course led by Tina Molohon, RN, TNS, Trauma Program Coordinator at St. John’s Hospital, and Noah Sisson, an instructor at St. John’s and a member of the Virden Fire Department.

“We’re going to train all staff, eventually,” said Carlinville superintendent of schools Dr. Becky Schuchman.

They started training bus drivers and cafeteria workers first.

“Bus drivers may come across an accident in remote areas,” said Schuchman. “We want them to be able to act quickly before the first responders show up.”

Carlinville Area Hospital donated Stop the Bleeding kits to be placed on each bus and in all the cafeterias within the school district.

Molohon said they have trained over 1800 in similar programs and just three weeks ago conducted training for the Carlinville law enforcement community.

The first part of the training involved tourniquets and properly getting them on a patient.

Sisson and Molohon both gave their expertise advice to those attending.

“Our goal is to make this training as common as CPR,” said Molohon.  “We always say the first person to touch a patient has the greatest chance of saving a life.”

The ABC’s of bleeding include   alert and calling 9-1-1; bleeding – finding the injury and compress – applying pressure to stop bleeding.

Before offering help, one should always ensure your own safety.

Once secure, open the clothing or remove the clothing from the source of bleeding and look for life-threatening bleeding.

If there is not a first-aid kit, apply direct pressure on the wound.

If there is a first-aid kit available, apply a tourniquet if available.

Or, in the case of no tourniquet, pack the wound with a bleeding control gauze, plain gauze or a clean cloth, then apply pressure with both hands.

“We can train from the very basics all the way to the advanced,” Sisson said. “Ultimately our goal is to stop massive bleeding.”

 Carlinville Area Hospital donated Stop the Bleed kits, containing a tourniquet and other basic first-aid supplies, to the Carlinville School District Wednesday morning during a training seminar conducted by St. John’s Regional Trauma Center in Springfield. From left, are Tina Molohon, RN, TNS, Trauma Program Coordinator at St. John’s Hospital in Springfield; Randall Suhling, HazMat Coordinator for Carlinville Area Hospital; Jim Roth, Carlinville School District transportation director; Dr. Becky Schuchman, Superintendent of Schools; and Noah Sisson, an instructor at St. John’s Hospital and a member of the Virden Fire Department.

 

 Carlinville School District employees Gary Babbs & Ron Hallbauer work on getting a tourniquet properly applied during a Stop the Bleed seminar last week. 

Carlinville School District employees Jennifer Robinson & Terri Stocker work on getting tourniquets properly applied during a Stop the Bleed seminar last week.