Local News

Local news 1

Local woman on a mission to help family

 Benefit concert in Greenfield slated for 7 p.m. May 4 By Eric Becker PALMYRA (April 19, 2018) […]

Local News 2

Council approves budget for 2018-19

CARLINVILLE (April 19, 2018) – After a public hearing, the Carlinville City Council in regular session Monday […]

Local News 3

Carlinville school board reorganizes

CARLINVILLE (April 19, 2018) – Carlinville’s Board of Education now has new officers, as the board reorganized […]

Local News 4

Truck driver charged with reckless homicide

HAMEL (April 19, 2018) – Mohamed Y. Jama, the semi driver who was involved in a November […]

Sports

Cavaliers beat Oilers, but Birds battle back to

By Eric Becker EAST ALTON (April 19, 2018) - Baseball is a game of momentum. One thinks they may have it figured out, then something goes completely bonkers to knock things out of whack. Carlinville’s baseball team had a pair of games over the past week. On Wednesday, the Cavaliers rallied past East Alton-Wood River 11-7, while on Friday, Southwestern scored five unanswered to beat Carlinville 5-4. Wednesday’s matchup with the Oilers got off to a good start for the Cavaliers, jumping out to a 6-0 lead by the middle of the second inning. By the end of the third, however, the Oilers had the lead at 7-6. Carlinville scored five runs in the fifth to avoid the loss and ended up with an 11-7 win. Aidan Naugle led off the game with

If you have romaine lettuce in your refrigerator, you should probably get rid of it. Below is information released today about an E. coli outbreak traced back to this food.

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Multi-State E. coli Infections Linked to Chopped Romaine Lettuce

SPRINGFIELD – The Illinois Department of Public Health (IDPH), along with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the Food and Drug Administration, and other state and local health departments, is investigating a multi-state cluster of E. coli infections linked to chopped romaine lettuce.

Information collected to date indicates that chopped romaine lettuce from the Yuma, Arizona growing region could be contaminated with E. coli O157:H7 and could make people sick. At this time, no common grower, supplier, distributor, or brand has been identified.

One case linked to the outbreak has been identified in Illinois. To date, 35 other cases have been reported in 11 states with 22 hospitalizations and no deaths. The Illinois resident reported consuming chopped romaine lettuce before illness onset, in central Illinois.

Consumers in Illinois who have store-bought chopped romaine lettuce at home, including salads and salad mixes containing chopped romaine lettuce, should not eat it and should throw it away, even if some of it was eaten and no one has gotten sick.

If you do not know if the lettuce is romaine, do not eat it and throw it away. Before purchasing romaine lettuce at a grocery store or eating it at a restaurant, consumers should confirm with the store or restaurant that it is not chopped romaine lettuce from the Yuma, Arizona growing region. If you cannot confirm the source of the romaine lettuce, do not buy it or eat it.

Restaurants and retailers should not serve or sell any chopped romaine lettuce, including salads and salad mixes containing chopped romaine lettuce, from the Yuma, Arizona growing region. Restaurants and retailers should ask their suppliers about the source of their chopped romaine lettuce.

People usually get sick from Shiga toxin-producing E. coli two-eight days after swallowing the germ. Most people infected with E. coli develop diarrhea (often bloody), severe stomach cramps, and vomiting. Most people recover within one week although some illnesses can be more severe, resulting in a type of kidney failure called hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS).
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If you have romaine lettuce in your refrigerator, you should probably get rid of it. Below is information released today about an E. coli outbreak traced back to this food.

---

Multi-State E. coli Infections Linked to Chopped Romaine Lettuce

SPRINGFIELD – The Illinois Department of Public Health (IDPH), along with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the Food and Drug Administration, and other state and local health departments, is investigating a multi-state cluster of E. coli infections linked to chopped romaine lettuce.

Information collected to date indicates that chopped romaine lettuce from the Yuma, Arizona growing region could be contaminated with E. coli O157:H7 and could make people sick. At this time, no common grower, supplier, distributor, or brand has been identified.

One case linked to the outbreak has been identified in Illinois. To date, 35 other cases have been reported in 11 states with 22 hospitalizations and no deaths. The Illinois resident reported consuming chopped romaine lettuce before illness onset, in central Illinois.

Consumers in Illinois who have store-bought chopped romaine lettuce at home, including salads and salad mixes containing chopped romaine lettuce, should not eat it and should throw it away, even if some of it was eaten and no one has gotten sick.

If you do not know if the lettuce is romaine, do not eat it and throw it away. Before purchasing romaine lettuce at a grocery store or eating it at a restaurant, consumers should confirm with the store or restaurant that it is not chopped romaine lettuce from the Yuma, Arizona growing region. If you cannot confirm the source of the romaine lettuce, do not buy it or eat it.

Restaurants and retailers should not serve or sell any chopped romaine lettuce, including salads and salad mixes containing chopped romaine lettuce, from the Yuma, Arizona growing region. Restaurants and retailers should ask their suppliers about the source of their chopped romaine lettuce.

People usually get sick from Shiga toxin-producing E. coli two-eight days after swallowing the germ. Most people infected with E. coli develop diarrhea (often bloody), severe stomach cramps, and vomiting. Most people recover within one week although some illnesses can be more severe, resulting in a type of kidney failure called hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS).
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